YouTube, Flickr Show Escalating Violence in Egyptian Protests

via Mashable! by Jolie O'Dell on 1/27/11


While most of Egypt is under an Internet and SMS blackout right now, the web is still showing the rest of the world a vivid and disturbing picture of what’s going on there.

Sources, mostly on-the-ground news outlets, have been able to upload images and video of the protests and police reactions that have rocked the Middle Eastern nation. The anti-government protests are being staged to force the ouster of current President Hosni Mubarak; at least six have been killed in the demonstrations.

While Twitter, Facebook and eventually the entire Internet have been blocked inside the country, we’ve still been able to get updates from citizen and professional journalists in Egypt. Here, we’ve gathered a collection of videos, mostly raw footage, posted to YouTube, as well as a few photos from Al Jazeera English’s Flickr stream.

Warning: Some of the content shown below is inherently violent and may not be suitable for some people.

Protests in Egypt, January 25-26

All images courtesy of Flickr, Al Jazeera English.

Protests in Egypt, January 25-26

All images courtesy of Flickr, Al Jazeera English.

Protests in Egypt, January 25-26

All images courtesy of Flickr, Al Jazeera English.

Protests in Egypt, January 25-26

All images courtesy of Flickr, Al Jazeera English.

Protests in Egypt, January 25-26

All images courtesy of Flickr, Al Jazeera English.

Protests in Egypt, January 25-26

All images courtesy of Flickr, Al Jazeera English.

Protests in Egypt, January 25-26

All images courtesy of Flickr, Al Jazeera English.

Suez, Egypt: Pro-Democracy Egyptian Protests Mubarak Demonstrations

28th Jan. 2010 – Storyful / Ed Rice compilation edit – Suez Egypt Pro-Democracy Egyptian Protests Mubarak Demonstrations – Full Story at: http://storyful.com/stories/1000000835-storyful-now-egyptian-protesters-conti…

[EGYPT] Protesters Go Up Against Truck Mounted Water Cannon, Cairo Demonstrations 017, 25/01/2011

The 2011 Egyptian protests are a continuing series of street demonstrations taking place throughout Egypt from January 2011 onwards, with organizers counting on the Tunisian uprising to inspire the crowds to mobilize. The demonstrations and riots were reported to have started over police brutality, State of emergency laws, unemployment, desire to raise the minimum wage, lack of housing, food inflation, corruption, lack of freedom of speech and poor living conditions. The protests main goal is to oust President Hosni Mubarak who has been in power for more than 30 years. While localized protests were already commonplace in previous years, major protests and riots erupted all over the country starting on 25 January, known as the “Day of Anger”, the date set by Egyptian opposition groups and others for a major demonstration. The 2011 protests have been called “unprecedented” for Egypt, and “some of the most serious civil unrest in recent memory” in the country. Hosni Mubarak presidency: President Hosni Mubarak has ruled Egypt since 1981. His government, which has been criticized in the media and amongst NGOs, is supported by the United States because of his “persecution of the Islamists generally supportive of Israel.” As a result, the initial reactions to Hosni Mubarak’s abuses by the U.S. were muted, and most instances of socio-political protest in the country, when they occurred at all, rarely made major news headlines. Corruption: While in office, political corruption in the Mubarak administration’s Ministry of Interior has risen dramatically, due to the increased power over the institutional system that is necessary to secure the prolonged presidency. Such corruption has led to the frequent imprisonment of political figures and young activists without trials, illegal undocumented hidden detention facilities, and rejecting universities, mosques, newspapers staff members based on political inclination.On a personnel level, each individual officer can and will violate citizens’ privacy in his area, using unconditioned arrests, common torture and abuse of power, depending on simply brute force, rather than law, to enforce order in the officer’s designated area.[citation needed] This has resulted in the common belief that “A policeman is more dangerous than a criminal”. The rise to power of powerful business men in the NDP in the federal government and People’s Assembly led to massive waves of anger during the years of Ahmed Nazif’s government. As a result, frequent laws and bills are passed, with undergiant monopolists (such as Ahmed Ezz’s) influence serving personal and corporational financial interests rather than public’s. Transparency International (TI) is an international organization addressing corruption, including, but not limited to, political corruption. In 2010, TI’s Corruption Perceptions Index report assessed Egypt with a CPI score of 3.1, based on perceptions of the degree of corruption from business people and country analysts, with 10 being highly clean and 0 being highly corrupt. Egypt ranked 98th out of the 178 countries included in the report. Police Brutality: Khaled Mohamed Saeed died under disputed circumstances in the Sedi Gabr area of Alexandria on June 6, 2010. Multiple witnesses have testified that Saeed was beaten to death by the police, On 25 June Mohamed ElBaradei, former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, led a rally in Alexandria against alleged abuses by the police and visited Saeed’s family to offer condolences. Economic Policy: About 40 percent of Egypt’s 80-million population lives on or around two dollars per day, and a large part of the population relies on subsidized goods. Protests: In Egypt, at least six cases of self-immolation have been reported, including a man arrested while trying to set himself on fire in downtown Cairo. Abdou Abdel-Moneim Jaafar, a 49-year-old restaurant owner, set himself alight in front of the Egyptian Parliament. Scale of protests: Thousands were protesting in the capital of Cairo on the 25th of January, with 15,000 alone occupying Tahrir square; 20,000 in various locations across Alexandria, 200 demonstrators were in the southern city of Aswan, 2000 in the eastern city of Ismailiya; and about 3000 in the northern city of Mahallah. . Egypt Egyptian Protests Street Demonstrations Tunisian Uprising Mobilize Police Brutality Unemployment Raise Minimum Wage Housing Food Inflation Corruption Freedom Of Speech Living Conditions Hosni Mubarak Day Anger Civil Unrest Government Khaled Mohamed Saeed Sedi Gabr Alexandria Death ElBaradei Self-immolation Tahrir Square Aswan Ismailiya Mahallah Human Rights Revolution Tear Gas Activists 25/01/2011

Three dead in Egypt protests as fighting continued overnight

Two civilians and a police officer have died after a wave of unusually large anti-government demonstrations swept across Egypt, calling for the ouster of longtime president Hosni Mubarak. In central Cairo, crowds numbering in the thousands protested and clashed with police throughout the day. Shortly after midnight on Wednesday morning, security forces violently dispersed those who remained in Tahrir Square, the heart of the city, Al Jazeera’s Adam Makary reported. Security officers fired tear gas, water cannons and rubber bullets to drive the protesters from the square, where they had chosen to remain throughout the night in protest. An Al Jazeera cameraman was shot with rubber bullets several times, including once in the face, Makary said. Telephone communication with people in central Cairo was nearly impossible, but Makary reported that the crowds, which had been peaceful, had been forced to escape the police, who fired dozens of tear gas canisters. But demonstrations occurred throughout Egypt. Two civilians died in the eastern city of Suez, according to an interior ministry offical. One, who had respiratory problems, died after inhaling tear gas; the other died after being hit with a rock thrown during a protest, the official said. In Cairo, a police officer died after being hit in the head with a rock during earlier protests in Tahrir Square, the official said. The demonstrations were reportedly the largest in years, rivaling those held against the Iraq War in 2003 and in favor of free elections and civil society reforms in 2005. On Tuesday night, hours after the countrywide protests began, the interior ministry issued a statement blaming the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt’s technically banned but largest opposition party, for fomenting the unrest. But the Brotherhood denied the accusation and had earlier stated its intention to stay out of the protest; indeed, some observers noted the lack of Brotherhood mobilization on Tuesday. algerian algeria cairo france mohamed bouteflika algerie émeutes riots maroc arabe england USA islam police ben ali egypt husni mubarak TUNISIE tunis news world war street israel محمد بوعزيزي tunisie egypt football الجزائر المغرب بوتفليقة تونس إنتفاضة حسني مبارك حرق العراق العرب الإسلام إسرائيل مصر القاهرة مصر الجزائر المغرب تونس الكويت دبي الإمارات قطر السودان البحرين لبنان فلسطين الأردن عمان ليبيا ا سوريا العراق العرب الخبر الأسبوعي الجزيرة العربية كرة القدم العاصمة القاهرة اليوم المغرب العار تونس الساحل الترجي الإفريقي علاء مبارك، محمود ياسين، محمود عبدالعزيز، حسين فهمي، صلاح السعدانى، يسرى، فيفي عبده، إلهام شهين، ميدو، شعبان عبدالرحيم، شريف منير، تامر حسنى، مرتضى منصور، محمد فؤاد، ماجد المصرى ، محمد سعد، محمد عطية, أحمد السقا، يوسف شعبان، محمح صبحي، زينة، إسعاد يونس، إبراهيم حسن, أحمد مكي، حكيم، هيثم شاكر، ،إيهاب توفيق، خالد الغندور،مصطفي عبده، مدحت شلبى، عمرو أديب, أحمد موسى، سمير زاهر أحمد بدير، فتحي عبد الوهاب، أحمد أدم، نهال عنبر، محمد حماقي،تامر البسيوني، إبراهيم حجازي، سعد الصغير، مصطفي البكري، ريهام سعيد و البنانيتين هيفاء وهبي و نانسي عجرم شوبير palestine libya algerie egypte egypte maroc muslim arab islam mohammed iraq saudi arabia bangladesh algerie maroc kabylie tunisie football sport humour comedie algerian egyptian

Mass Egypt Anti-government Protest Planned

Egyptian activists protested for a third day as social networking sites called for a mass rally in the capital Cairo after Friday prayers, keeping up the momentum of the country’s largest anti-government protests in years. (Jan. 27)

Raw Video: Man Shot in Egypt Protest

Violence escalated in two cites outside the Egyptian capital Cairo on Thursday as anti-government protests continued to grip the country and challenge President Hosni Mubarak’s regime. (Jan. 27)

More About: al jazeera, demonstrations, Egypt, jan25, photo, protests, video

For more Video coverage:

http://feedads.g.doubleclick.net/~ah/f/9m6h8omben53fuj7ghgrctkjc8/300/250?ca=1&fh=280#http%3A%2F%2Fmashable.com%2F2011%2F01%2F27%2Fyoutube-flickr-show-escalating-violence-in-egyptian-protests%2F

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s